Lindsey Morgan Always Keeps It 100 « Lindsey Morgan Fan | Your #1 Lindsey Morgan fansite!
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On CW’s hit post-apocalyptic drama The 100, Lindsey Morgan plays Raven Reyes, a badass mechanic. Which, really, doesn’t seem too much of a stretch for her. For one, the Houston native exudes bona fide badass energy when we speak, saying whatever she damn well pleases without thinking twice about it. (She also boxes and does Muay Thai and can probably lift more than you.) For another, she’s keen on fixing things in real life: she’s an ambassador for Active Minds, a nonprofit organization supporting mental health awareness and suicide prevention for young adults. While other celebs are intent on refining their Facetune chops on their Insta feeds, Morgan uses hers to spread messages about finding cracks of light in a bleak world.

We sat down with Lindsey to chat about her come up, depression and anxiety, and the importance of getting real in an innately phony social media landscape.

So, let’s start off by talking about The 100. Those who’ve seen it know it’s an amazing show, from the story to even the costumes. What’s it been like working with that crew?
I don’t know why, but something in me wanted to make a joke and be like, “Oh that shithole? It’s terrible.” But yeah, it’s been really rewarding to be able to work on something for now going into six years and growing with a group of people, where we have become a family. But it’s always like, we don’t know how long it’s going to go. We don’t know how long we’ll get the opportunity to do this. So, every year that passes is becoming more and more of a special world for us. And I know we are all very grateful for it. So yeah, it’s been the best job of my life. I’ve learned so much, I’ve grown so much as a person, as an actor, as a professional. I don’t know who I’d be without it.

Was acting something you always wanted to do? Or was it something that just spontaneously came up?
It definitely wasn’t something I always wanted to do. I wasn’t the kid who wanted all the attention, that was cracking people up, or anything like that. Actually, I was very shy as a child and I really liked painting and drawing — just really quiet all the time, in the corner painting by myself. [Laughs.] So, I’d say I’m 50 per cent introvert and 50 per cent extrovert. The idea of all the attention on me, and all eyes on me, kind of terrified me. It still does, in a sense. But there was something about acting, something about the idea of transforming and being exposed and being vulnerable. I remember I went to go see a musical — I think I was seven — with my mom and I saw the actors come out on stage and they were performing, and they were just so great. I was like, Wow, if I could be brave like them, then I would be great. From there, I just had this secret desire to do that. But I turned 18 and took a different path; I was really interested in politics and journalism and very good, very serious things. But I knew they never stimulated the creative side of me. So, I had this small part in a play in high school and I was putting on my makeup and I had this kind of epiphany, where I was like, If I could do this every day, I’d be happy.

Oh, wow.
Yeah, but you know, it was just as simple and pure as the one I had when I was seven, when I was just like, Wow, those people who do that are brave. I want to do that. I just listened to that voice, whatever that voice was, and my heart, and then my dad. And I’ve never felt any doubt about it.

That’s a great feeling.
Yeah, I know! I have doubts about what I’m going to have for breakfast! And for this it’s like, nope, I’m doing this for the rest of my life. Ok. Done. Bye. [Laughs.]

Read the rest of the interview at the source

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